Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Another "home" for dollar weed?

Mary's last post "Seen this culprit lately?" detailed 3 reasons why you might find dollar weed in your lawn. In my yard there is a fourth reason you will find dollar weed, it is used as an attractive feature of a rain garden. I have been planning to create a wetland micro-garden or pond for quite a while and decided to incorporate my edge aquatic or wetland plants which are potted in galvanized containers and arranged into a "rain garden."

What is a rain garden? A rain garden is a low-lying area created to capture rain water runoff and allow the water to find it's way back into the ground instead of down a storm drain. I have already installed a rain barrel to catch runoff from a dip in my roof line but once the barrel is full, the water spills over onto the surrounding walkway and evaporates once the sun comes out again. In this case, I lowered the ground next to the walkway allowing the rain water to flow into the garden.

In addition the rain garden will become home to many small, delicate, native wetland plants. As my plant palette continues to expand I have become  fascinated with minute yet exquisite flowers we often overlook.  Some are larval hosts to butterflies! Most of the flowering plants used here have white blooms so this will be a fascinating moonlight garden as well.

Most of the plants used in this garden should not be allowed to dry out, although some can tolerate dry periods in the less active growing period that we refer to as winter here in South Florida.  Those that need constant water, like dollar weed, are irrigated with rain water stored in my rain barrels.

Where did I "acquire" the dollar weed for my garden? From a very wet lawn in my neighborhood!

For more information on rain gardens visit http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep424
Barbara McAdam
Florida Yards and Neighborhoods
305.248.3311 ext. 245

1 comment:

  1. A rain garden is a low-lying area created to capture rain water runoff and allow the water to find it's way back into the ground instead...native wetland plants

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